Breast Health & Exercise

You know that exercise is good for you. It’s good for you mood. It’s good for your heart. It’s good for your waistline. Did you know that it’s good for your breasts too?

Exercise lowers levels of estrogen in your body, which, in turn, reduces your risk for breast cancer. According to a U.S. News & World Report from 2012, women who exercise 2 hours a day, 5 days per week are 30% less likely to develop breast cancer than sedentary women. If you don’t think you can fit all that exercise into your busy mom schedule, note that women who did any exercise at all had a 6% lower risk of breast cancer. That’s not bad!

Make it a family thing. One study showed that girls as young as 12 can begin decreasing their risk for breast cancer by increasing their activity levels. There is no reason you have to wait until the age of 12 to get your kids involved in exercise with you though! Exercising with your children is emotionally and physically rewarding. It can be something as simple as taking a walk in the park with your child. Of course, if you’ve got stroller-aged children, you can bring your kids to Stroller Strides, starting their interest in fitness before the first birthday and growing a lifelong love of healthy activities early on.

On the other end of the spectrum and think it's too late to get those benefits? The same study showing decreased breast cancer risk in relation to exercise showed similar results for pre- and post-menopausal women. According to cancer.gov, obesity is especially a risk factor for breast cancer in “postmenopausal women who have not used hormone replacement therapy.” This may be because after the ovaries finish producing estrogen, fat cells become the primary source of the hormone. The high estrogen levels in obese women increase risks for tumors.

There is no time like the present when it comes to health! Everything you do to keep yourself active as you age is reducing your risk for breast cancer. If you are no longer a stroller-pushing mama, Body Back classes can help you get on the track to a more active lifestyle.

Even if you’ve had breast cancer, regular exercise can prevent recurrence. Just make sure that you talk to your doctor before beginning an exercise program and get the go-ahead. Discuss the intensity level you should start with and whether or not there are any exercises you should avoid. Note: If you have or are at-risk for lymphedema as a result of breast cancer, exercise can help reduce swelling, but the National Lymphedema network does advise exercising under medical supervision and preferably with the advice of a certified lymphedema therapist.

So, no matter what your age, get up and get active for your breasts sake!

Note: If you have or are at-risk for lymphedema as a result of breast cancer, exercise can help reduce swelling, but the National Lymphedema network does advise exercising under medical supervision and preferably with the advice of a certified lymphedema therapist.

Reference

Document URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/413235771?accountid=41449

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